Returning to work

Before you have your baby you may be able to plan your return to work with some emotional detachment. However, after you have held your baby you may wish to reassess your carefully laid plans.

Here are a few points to help you plan the transition from home back into the work force.

  • Consider your current role at work and assess if it is possible to return to your job in its current form. For example, if your job involves long hours or frequent trips away from home, you may consider this unacceptable when you are a mum. If the answer is no perhaps you could talk to your employer in advance or use your time while on parental leave to look for a more suitable position.
  • Working from home is becoming a more acceptable work practice today. There are many benefits to home based work for both you and your employer. These include increased productivity, flexible working hours, reduced absenteeism, and the ability to retain a well-trained work force. You will save on time away from the home by cutting out travel time.
  • It is worth considering your childcare options before you start work. Take some time to investigate your choices for childcare. They include a day care centre and a helper in your home. Childcare places are limited and long waiting lists are common. Consider placing your name at a few centres. When thinking about the location of childcare, consider if it would be better to have the childcare near your work or home, who will be most likely to drop off and pick up your child. 

The information published herein is intended and strictly only for informational, educational, purposes and the same shall not be misconstrued as medical advice. If you are worried about your own health, or your child’s well being, seek immediate medical advice. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries assumes no liability for the interpretation and/or use of the information contained in this article. Further, while due care and caution has been taken to ensure that the content here is free from mistakes or omissions, Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries makes no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information here, and to the extent permitted by law, Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries do not accept any liability or responsibility for claims, errors or omissions.

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