30th week of pregnancy

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30 Weeks Pregnant – What To Expect?

When someone tells you you’re glowing, believe them. You are!

 At 30 weeks, baby’s position is still head up. Your 30-week fetus is floating comfortably in about 1½ pints of amniotic fluid. It may seem cramped in there, but he or she still has room to move around. Over the upcoming weeks, your belly will grow even further past your rib cage to accommodate baby, but he or she will still get a little more crowded as you approach your due date.

 

Your baby's brain has grown and his nervous system is almost mature. At birth, they will have millions of neurons just waiting for lots of loving interaction and stimulation from you, to help them form the synapses which will link the neurons together. Don't wait until your baby is born before you start communicating with him or her. Talking, singing, massaging your tummy and visualising what your baby will look like will all help you form an early emotional connection.

 

Your physical changes this week

 

 

Your baby is getting bigger and its close vicinity to your bladder i.e. on top means that it won't take much urine volume to make you feel uncomfortable. Try not to rush out of the toilet too quickly though. It's important to completely empty your bladder each time you go, to avoid the risk of developing a urinary tract infection.

Varicose veins are not helped by the pressure of your uterus on the major blood vessels in your pelvis. Unfortunately, they are likely to get worse before they get better. Some women develop varicose veins in their vulva, a particularly uncomfortable condition especially if combined with hemorrhoids. Supportive underwear with a Lycra component, support panty hose, cooling baths + showers and avoiding standing for long can all help.

Hints of the week

  • You might notice your 30 weeks pregnant belly getting pretty hard and tight at times. Yes, at 30 weeks pregnant Braxton Hicks contractions are common. These are your body’s way of gearing up for birth. If you get them, sit down or lie on your side, relax, and drink water. If the contractions don’t stop, or if you have four or more in an hour, call your doctor.
  • Having pregnancy brain can cause your brain to be as retentive as a sieve. Jot down the queries you have as they crop up. Never feel embarrassed to ask your health care provider any questions.
  • Read up whatever information you can on pregnancy and caring for a new baby. Now is the time to boost your knowledge and build your own, early philosophies on how you want to raise your baby.