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Premature baby care

Going home

When a premature baby is ready to go home parents may feel that the worst is over, but premature baby care can be quite daunting adjusting to the transition from hospital to home.

Parents may experience separation anxiety from leaving the well supported environment of the hospital, including professionals who may have known and cared for their baby for an extended period of time.

Some parents may already feel emotionally and physically fatigued from visiting their baby daily in hospital. Once their baby is home, the interrupted sleep and physical demands required in caring for a new baby can contribute to a feeling of total exhaustion and risk of burn out.

Concerns about baby’s weight gain and feeding are often raised whether baby is breast or formula fed. The breastfeeding mother may be trying to maintain her supply, encourage feeding stamina and juggle expressing and feeding on demand. There may be some babies still requiring feeding by a tube through their nose (nasogastric feeding).

Some premature babies will continue to require oxygen when they go home and possible monitoring for apneas (stop breathing). This requires managing oxygen cylinders, associated tubing and other specialized equipment.

Most premature babies will have some medical follow up after they are discharged to monitor growth and development. Premature baby care appointments to see a pediatrician, surgeon, optometrist, audiologist and other relevant allied health professionals may be needed for a follow up. Often families have a financial outlay to attend these appointments combined with travel and parking costs.

Do you know that an average baby will need 1057 nappy changes in the first 6 months? Get exclusive promotions and free diaper samples by joining the Huggies Club now!

 

The information published herein is intended and strictly only for informational, educational, purposes and the same shall not be misconstrued as medical advice. If you are worried about your own health, or your child’s well being, seek immediate medical advice. You should never delay seeking medical advice, disregard medical advice, or discontinue medical treatment because of information on this website. Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries assumes no liability for the interpretation and/or use of the information contained in this article. Further, while due care and caution has been taken to ensure that the content here is free from mistakes or omissions, Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries makes no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information here, and to the extent permitted by law, Kimberly-Clark and/ or its subsidiaries do not accept any liability or responsibility for claims, errors or omissions.

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